The University of Iowa

Jude Nutter

Jude Nutter was born in North Yorkshire, England, and grew up near Hannover, in northern Germany. She studied printmaking at Winchester School of Art (U.K.) and received her M.F.A. in poetry from The University of Oregon. Her poems have appeared in numerous national and international journals and have received over forty awards and grants, including two McKnight Fellowships, The Moth International Poetry Prize, The Larry Levis Prize, The William Matthews Prize, the Joy Harjo Poetry Award, and grants from the Elizabeth George Foundation and the National Science Foundation’s Writers and Artists Program in Antarctica. Jude is the author of four full-length collections: Pictures of the Afterlife (Salmon Poetry, Ireland, 2002), winner of the Irish Listowel Prize; The Curator of Silence (University of Notre Dame Press 2007), winner of the Ernest Sandeen Prize and the 2007 Minnesota Book Award in poetry; I Wish I Had a Heart Like Yours, Walt Whitman (University of Notre Dame Press, 2009), winner of the 2010 Minnesota Book Award in poetry and Poetry Book of the Year from ForeWord Review, New York); and Dead Reckoning (Salmon Poetry, Ireland, 2020). Jude currently teaches in Minneapolis and divides her time between Minnesota and Dingle, Ireland, where she has a family home.

 

Instructor Events

Weeklong July 19 to July 24 2020
Instructor(s): 
Jude Nutter

The line break is the poet’s most powerful, and problematic, tool: powerful because it does so much work; problematic because its function and structure change from poem to poem and it often seems arbitrary. In reality, poets are constantly assessing and reassessing their line breaks and end words as they work. This workshop is a combination of discussion, generating new work, and sharing of your own poems; it will deepen your understanding and mastery of the poetic line.

Weekend July 25 to July 26 2020
Instructor(s): 
Jude Nutter

“…[T]he story of our life/becomes our life” claims Lisel Mueller in her marvelous poem “Why We Tell Stories.” But how does one create a compelling, credible and multi-layered story in a poem without becoming prosaic; a poem that develops a web of connections, delivers a lyric frisson, and reveals a larger message or insight? And why do we want and need stories in the first place: what role and significance do stories have in our personal and social lives? Does a person, as Barry Lopez claims, sometimes need stories more than food in order to stay alive?