University of Iowa

Martin Pousson

Martin Pousson is a Creative Writing professor at California State University Northridge in Los Angeles. He earned his M.F.A. in Creative Writing at Columbia University, where he won the inaugural School of the Arts Dean’s Fellowship Award. He has taught at Columbia University, Rutgers University, and Loyola University in New Orleans. His first novel, No Place, Louisiana, was a finalist for the John Gardner Fiction Book Award, and his first collection of poetry, Sugar, was a finalist for the Lambda Literary Award in Gay Poetry. His second novel, Black Sheep Boy, won the PEN Center USA Fiction Award and a National Endowment for the Arts Fellowship, and it was a shortlist finalist for the Simpson Family Literary Prize. The novel-in-stories also was featured on NPR’s The Reading Life, as a Los Angeles Times Literary Pick and a Book Riot Must-Read Indie Press Book. Stories from Black Sheep Boy were selected for the annual Best Gay Stories and Best Gay Speculative Fiction anthologies and were finalists for both the Glimmer Train Open and Very Short Fiction Awards.

Instructor Events

Weeklong July 14 to July 19 2019
Instructor(s): 
Martin Pousson

What is the difference between a linked collection of stories and a novel-in-stories? Are these merely new terms for old forms, or is a new direction now possible for writers? Increasingly, a once contested category is becoming more accepted and more viable, with an in-between road to book publication cutting a way between the sometimes difficult-to-sell short story collection and the sometimes difficult-to-read novel.

Weekend July 13 to July 14 2019
Instructor(s): 
Martin Pousson

What is the difference between miniatures, drabbles, micro-fiction, palm stories, twitterature, and short shorts? In turn, how are these forms different from flash fiction, sudden fiction, and very short fiction? Is the answer more quantitative than qualitative, or does the selection of a frame—and form—change more than the number of words within a story? Increasingly, literary magazines promote contests in shorter and shorter narrative forms to feature on smart phones, tablets, and social media sites.