University of Iowa

Weeklong June 16 to June 21 2019

Weeklong June 16 to June 21 2019
Instructor(s): 
Amy Butcher

You’re out of shape, bored of the same routine, or simply haven’t had the time to keep that promise you made to yourself in January. You’re stuck, in other words, in one way or in several. You need that extra push. Welcome to Essay Bootcamp. In this course, we’ll sweat our way back into the writing chair and work our way up to heavy lifting—of pencils and of thought—through a dozen new and generative exercises guaranteed to jumpstart a year of writing.

Weeklong June 16 to June 21 2019
Instructor(s): 
Max Garland

Borrowing a phrase from Toni Morrison, in this workshop we’ll help each other imagine our way toward what seems distant, strange, remote to our experience. Also, we’ll work our poems toward a deeper imagining of things close at hand: people, places and things so familiar we may have become blinded to their beauty or sadness or depth. One thinks of Pablo Neruda’s odes on common objects which wind up exploding the mundane into the fabulous.

Weeklong June 16 to June 21 2019
Instructor(s): 
Marc Nieson

“The best literature is always about matters of the human heart,” Larry Brown posited. And it’s true, certain tales are more moving than others. You look up from their last page startled to remember your life—the one you now must return to—as somewhat strange and distant. Or, as perhaps more familiar and treasured than you ever realized. How do some stories achieve such rare imprints of dislocation and connection? Amazing us or haunting us, touching us, perhaps even shifting our perspectives on what is real?

Weeklong June 16 to June 21 2019
Instructor(s): 
Maxine Swann

In one moment your character is a blurry outline on the page and in the next she comes vividly alive. How and why does this happen? And how can you learn as a writer to make it happen again and again?

 

Weeklong June 16 to June 21 2019
Instructor(s): 
Mieke Eerkens

From photojournalism, to graphic novels and memoirs, to narrative cartography, the contemporary literary arts are increasingly hybridized, borrowing from other media and unconcerned with crossing categorical boundaries. Visual artists are incorporating language into their work, and writers are incorporating visual components into their work. This course will focus on the interesting ways in which image and language can work together. We will examine the increasingly popular genre of graphic novels and nonfiction.

Weeklong June 16 to June 21 2019
Instructor(s): 
Eric Goodman

This is an advanced novel writing workshop. It is designed for students who are fairly far along in or have finished the draft of a novel. Each student will submit up to fifteen pages—preferably the first fifteen, but not necessarily—to be considered in workshop. We will discuss, as a group, how to go from rough draft to final draft.

 

Weeklong June 16 to June 21 2019
Instructor(s): 
Sands Hall

Are you working on a memoir? This course is designed for you. It will also be useful to any writer interested in exploring how fictional strategies help us get our personal stories effectively across to the reader.

 

Weeklong June 16 to June 21 2019
Instructor(s): 
Christine Hemp

Especially during times of change and upheaval, we yearn for something called home. Whether you’ve arrived from another country, have lived in one Iowa farmhouse your whole life, or you relocate to a new city every year, this class is about the places we inhabit. How have they changed us (for better or for worse)? Why do they transform us—yet again—when we write about them? And why do some houses or landscapes offer us a sense of belonging? This is a generative week, and we’ll do lots of writing in and out of class.

Weeklong June 16 to June 21 2019
Instructor(s): 
Jim Heynen

This workshop will begin with life experience, but we’ll use what we remember as a springboard for imaginative verbal adventures. The moment we give our attention to form, whether that be in the music and repetition we associate with poetry or the structure and narrative progression we associate with fiction, what we thought was only a memory can take on new and unexpected life.

Weeklong June 16 to June 21 2019
Instructor(s): 
Wayne Johnson

All of us encounter dramas in life that seem tailor-made for narrative. But when sitting down to pen such seeming “ready-mades,” we often find that they don’t come to life, drag, or simply seem to lose their once brilliant shine when committed to paper. So, we ask, how do writers such as Bill Bryson, Jon Krakauer, and Sebastian Junger write such engaging narratives? Or Mary Karr, Jeannette Walls, and Tobias Wolff?

Weeklong June 16 to June 21 2019
Instructor(s): 
Lon Otto

As challenging as the completion of a draft is, the work of significant revision that follows can be equally daunting. This is not a matter of light housekeeping—dusting, polishing, tidying up. Very rarely that’s all a draft needs; normally something bigger needs to happen before a substantial piece of writing achieves its full potential. Walls might need to be knocked down and rebuilt, new powerlines connected, skylights opened up.

Weeklong June 16 to June 21 2019
Instructor(s): 
Sandra Scofield

You have a story you are burning to tell. You're carrying it around in you, but you haven't even started. OR: You're writing but you aren't sure you can make it to the end. It's prime time to learn key concepts, such as the difference between plot, chronology, and structure. What it means for a character to have agency. How to write a scene sequence. You don't have to do these things in lockstep with the order of your story. You can roam the narrative to test the strength of events and the logic of the steps you take in telling them.