University of Iowa

Tameka Cage Conley

Tameka Cage Conley, Ph.D., is a graduate of The University of Iowa Writers’ Workshop. She currently holds the Provost Postgraduate Visiting Writer Fellowship in fiction and teaches advanced fiction writing at The University of Iowa. As a literary artist, she writes fiction, poetry, plays, librettos and essays. She received a doctoral degree in English in 2006 from Louisiana State University, where she was a recipient of the Huel Perkins Doctoral Fellowship. Her dissertation, Painful Discourses: Borders, Regions, and Representations of Female Circumcision from Africa to America, was awarded the annual Lewis Simpson Distinguished Dissertation Award. She has received writing fellowships from the Cave Canem Poetry Foundation, the Vermont Studio Center, the Virginia Center for the Creative Arts, and the Squaw Valley Writers Conference and Workshops. Her work has appeared in The Virginia Quarterly Review, Ploughshares, Callaloo, African American Review and elsewhere. She is currently at work on her first novel, a family epic that chronicles the untimely deaths of African American men over six decades in Caddo Parish.

Instructor Events

Weekend July 27 to July 28 2019
Instructor(s): 
Tameka Cage Conley

Who are we and from where do we come? What are the narratives—true, false, somewhere in-between—that have shaped the music of our lives? How can the poetic form be used to interrogate the self in relation to the family, the world at large, and the world that we can’t often see—the world of the soul?

Weeklong July 14 to July 19 2019
Instructor(s): 
Tameka Cage Conley

Our stories can move chronologically. They can also zigzag and weave in and out of time, utilizing flashback to thrust the plot forward and to strengthen and enhance lines of tension—worry, pressure, stress, dis-ease—that our characters experience as their worlds unfold and reveal struggles for them to face, to ponder, to question, to conquer, to perish from. In this workshop, we will consider how to manage the past, present, and the future in our fiction, while simultaneously watering the seeds of suspense.